ACGN35

Help! There is a Sound Problem! (HSW)

Recent trends show developers and end-users modifying existing spaces to serve a shifting array of needs; often these decisions are driven by cost. Spaces suited for one purpose could be acoustically unsuitable for another. Achieving a suitably acceptable compromise can be very challenging in an existing building where structural limitations or other feasibility issues are apparent. This program reviews a number of case studies and will teach you how to calibrate, anticipate, and address expectations or potential issues to avert an ‘acoustical disaster’.

ACGN388

How to be a Good Neighbor: What You Need to Know about Emergency Generator Noise (HSW)

Emergency generators are a component of a wide range of buildings from private residences to public hospitals. Regardless of the emergency generator’s size, noise emission is a common community concern. We will examine noise regulations concerning emergency generators and share noise mitigation solutions to be a good neighbor.

ITHC03

Information Technology in Healthcare: An overview of recent changes to Design Standards and Guidelines (HSW)

For many years generic design standards and guidelines have been available to assist architects and engineers incorporate information technology infrastructure into the building design process. Recently, a number of new design standards have emerged that provide detailed guidelines for specific building types such as higher education, K-12 schools, and healthcare facilities. This presentation reviews the ANSI/TIA 1179 Healthcare Infrastructure Standard that was ratified in August of this year and its affect on the design of healthcare facilities. This presentation will also review how trends in technology and converged networking are changing building design, the need for technology support spaces and the demand for traditional wired data outlets.

ACGN25

Sounds Great! Design Considerations for Tough Spaces (HSW)

Innovative spaces that serve multiple purposes are most successful when they are aesthetically pleasing and achieve the intended acoustic goals. Forward-thinking ideas and technologies can create designs that “sound great”— both literally and figuratively. Spaces used by multiple departments in the corporate or academic worlds often serve several groups with different needs, ranging from group discussions to speaker presentations to several one-on-one conversations. Newly constructed and renovated spaces present unique challenges in catering to the varying preferences. Properly designed spaces that can be modified easily and quickly according to the users’ requirements can result in considerable savings in cost and square footage.

AVGN18

Interior Technology: Designing High-Tech Spaces that People Love to Use

People want the latest technologies, but for these products to be considered successful they must be (a) easy-to-use (b) well-integrated into the building infrastructure and (c) reliable. In this session we will discuss strategies for sophisticated room design and share comments from end-users. Optimal high-tech design requires close design team collaboration. All of the participants (architect, interior designer, client’s staff and consultants) play a role in creating the high-tech environment that people will use. It is also a process of compromise since the real world requires well-thought out trade-offs in budgetary, technical, operational and administrative objectives and goals.

Variable Acoustics in Performance Spaces

This session will explore ways designers can incorporate a wide range of systems and materials to accommodate a variety of acoustics program requirements. Learn about time patterns, spatial relationships, and successful models.

ACGN01

Acoustics 101 (HSW)

This program covers the fundamentals of architectural acoustics as well as some commonly misunderstood principles. Topics include: sound generation and travel; human sound perceptions; sound level descriptors; and acoustic properties of materials.

ACAV10

Communications in Collaborative Spaces (HSW)

More and more clients are requesting the collaborative spaces from designers. This includes both collaborating with each other within the same room, and collaborating with peers across the globe. Sometimes this is a flexible-use space that allows users to mobilize and have group discussions, and other times it is more of a lecture-style space that must also accommodate for group discussions from the audience. These rooms not only have technology requirements to house, but also have acoustic challenges that need to be addressed in order to make these rooms successful. Acoustics, noise control, room size/shape, and thoughtful AV design greatly enhance the professors’, students’, and distant learners’ experiences and, in many instances, make the difference between a favored room and an unused room. We will describe what those requirements and challenges are and give you some tools to help create a space your clients will enjoy using. Numerous project examples will be shown, along with demonstrations of online collaboration tools.

ACAV07

NFPA 72 Mass Notification Regulations

The National Fire Protection Association mandates that within public acoustically distinguishable spaces (ADS) where voice communication systems are required, the system can reproduce pre-recorded, synthesized, or live messages with voice intelligibility. Meeting NFPA’s criteria requires careful design, especially for facilities with acoustically dissimilar spaces, like mass transit, healthcare, higher education, and convention centers. A case study describes the process of achieving voice intelligibility in ADS from preliminary design to final testing.

ACAV06

NFPA 72 Fire Alarm Code: Mass Notification System Design Overview

With the release of NFPA 72-2010, opportunities for mass notification technology have increased. Today, alarm and mass notification systems must provide threat-specific verbal guidance and instruction for a variety of threats and hazards, not only within a building, but also outdoors (across a campus for example). Learn about the main components of a mass notification system: identifying acoustically distinguishable spaces, audio system and data network design including fault-tolerance, redundancy and survivability, high-power speaker areas and voice intelligibility testing.