Work it Out: Fitness Centers in Mixed Use Buildings

This course is intended to help architects, engineers, and especially building owners understand the issues that can arise when trying to bring an active fitness facility into a mixed use building or development and how these issues can best be addressed. The session will include a discussion of the various types of fitness franchises and the acoustic concerns that come along with them (as well as how to deal with such concerns though architectural and managerial methods). We will also cover the basics on how sound propagates through a building, and discuss what features (in terms of building type and tenant location) to look for (or avoid) when planning for a new tenant or a new franchise location. This course will also include demonstrations and case studies of specific issues and the methods used to resolve them.

NVHC01

Noise and Vibration in Healthcare Facilities (HSW)

Healthcare facilities generally house a variety of equipment and spaces that are sensitive to noise and vibration. This presentation will address issues related to day-to-day operations, unique situations that arise, such as those due to nearby construction. We introduce the concepts of vibration and noise criteria as they relate to sensitive equipment and spaces. Using the special case of MRIs, we will discuss potential sources of building vibration and mitigation measures. We will also discuss the potential impacts of the MRI operation on neighboring spaces with respect to airborne noise and structure-borne vibration. Construction-related vibrations are also a potentially huge source of disruption for hospital facilities. We will examine the potential impact of construction vibrations, methods to predict impact and possible mitigation methods.

ACHC01

Acoustics and Healthcare Facilities (HSW)

Effective designs for healthcare facilities include attention to acoustics. This session will be a survey of architectural acoustics and mechanical system noise and vibration concerns relating to healthcare facilities. Learn fundamental elements for addressing speech privacy, sound isolation, room finishes, and HVAC noise and vibration control. Topics will be organized by design phase to present a logical and cost effective approach.

NVGN120

Controlling Cogen and Chiller Plant Noise & Vibration in Educational Settings (HSW)

Educational facility expansion projects often include installing new or upgrading existing chiller and cogeneration power equipment. The noise and vibration produced by chiller and power plants can become issues within adjacent building spaces and in the nearby community. To address these issues in a cost-effective manner, they should be evaluated early-on in the overall project design phase, and as indicated, be resolved with the project team. We will outline the evaluation process, highlight cost-effective mitigation measures, and discuss several representative projects.

 

 

ACGN45

There Goes the Neighborhood! (or not) – Acoustical Considerations for Mixed-Use Developments (HSW)

Many urban centers are seeing an increased interest in mixed-use developments, which provide numerous advantages. However, these developments also pose significant noise control challenges, both within the buildings and in the surrounding neighborhoods. We will present select case studies demonstrating typical problems and possible solutions.

NVGN18

A Vibration Primer for Architects

Vibrations in buildings are caused by many sources and may affect people and sensitive equipment. Learn what the jargon of vibration specifications and criteria means – how vibrations are described – and get some insight into how things vibrate and how vibration reductions can be achieved. Obtain an overview of vibration sources and check-list of design considerations.

NVGN01

Overview of Vibration Design Criteria in Laboratory and High-Tech Facilities

An introduction to the architectural issues related to such vibration-sensitive equipment as used for precision metrology, microbiology, and optical research. We will describe viable approaches for protecting such equipment from vibrations caused by ground motions, personnel activities, and machinery. Topics will include the concepts of favorable layouts, structures, and equipment isolation.

ACGN17

Vibration and Noise in AIR-RIGHTS Buildings

With an ever-increasing interest in constructing buildings close to hectic traffic corridors, intrusive vibrations and noise have emerged as major concerns for designers. We will discuss the basic mechanisms of vibration, noise generation, structural transmission, criteria for evaluating the potential problems, and the means for addressing these issues.

ACNV001

Acoustic and Vibration Isolation in Multi-Family Residences (HSW)

Can you hear the stereo in the next apartment over, or the footsteps of your neighbors from the condo above yours? Are you bothered by the subway every time it rumbles by? According to the International Building Code, partitions and constructions between residences should have a minimum Sound Transmission Class (STC) of 50 and a minimum Impact Insulation Class (IIC) of 50 (45 if field is measured). This language has been adopted by many state building codes (including Massachusetts). Vibration from underground rail lines can be an important source of environmental sound and vibration in residential buildings. The characteristic low-frequency rumble from passing subway trains can be a source for residents living in nearby buildings. Methods exist to predict the levels of noise and vibration from rail operations in new buildings, and the probability that a resident would be annoyed by that vibration/noise.

Real-Time Monitoring during Construction: Co-Existing with Vibration-Sensitive Issues

The existence of construction and renovation projects in populated areas inevitably creates noise and vibration for both neighbors and occupants with sensitivities ranging from inconsequential to critical. Through a proper understanding of specialized, ultra-low requirements and the use of real-time feedback from monitoring systems, projects can be managed to eliminate guesswork, inefficiencies and after-the-fact claims for the contractor, and give peace of mind to the facility owner who knows someone is watching their interests. In this workshop, we will compare a variety of potential adjacent sensitivities, ranging from university research labs, health care facilities, museums, data centers and performance spaces. In doing so, we will look at some real-world examples from projects and actual approaches to mitigation and monitoring. By using best practices, any project can hope to proceed agreeably instead of under possibly avoidable adversarial conditions.