ACNV02

Work it Out: Fitness Centers in Mixed Use Buildings

This course is intended to help architects, engineers, and especially building owners understand the issues that can arise when trying to bring an active fitness facility into a mixed use building or development and how these issues can best be addressed. The session will include a discussion of the various types of fitness franchises and the acoustic concerns that come along with them (as well as how to deal with such concerns though architectural and managerial methods). We will also cover the basics on how sound propagates through a building, and discuss what features (in terms of building type and tenant location) to look for (or avoid) when planning for a new tenant or a new franchise location. This course will also include demonstrations and case studies of specific issues and the methods used to resolve them.

ACAV11

Senior Hospital(ity): Acoustic and AV Design Across the Continuum of Care (HSW)

America’s Baby Boomers are entering retirement and many are starting to think about the next stage of their lives. Retirement communities and senior living facilities have seen a marked population increase in the past decade, and that trend is expected to continue. When planning a new facility for seniors, there are special technology and acoustic considerations — these aren’t your typical multi-family projects. In this session, we will discuss how new FGI guidelines apply to senior living facilities, skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers, and hospitals, as well as how to address the unique acoustics requirements of an aging population. We will also discuss how technology is being increasingly used as a method to aid in the delivery of patient care.

ACGN38

Addressing Sound Transmission in Residence (HSW)

Ever since the beginning of multi-family dwellings, sound isolation between residential units has generated significant tension. Residents want privacy from the people living next to them, even though they may be less than a few feet away from one another. According to the International Building Code, partitions and constructions between residences should have a minimum Sound Transmission Class (STC) of 50 and a minimum Impact Insulation Class (IIC) of 50 (45 if field measured). This language has been adopted by many state building codes including New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

ACGN45

There Goes the Neighborhood! (or not) – Acoustical Considerations for Mixed-Use Developments (HSW)

Many urban centers are seeing an increased interest in mixed-use developments, which provide numerous advantages. However, these developments also pose significant noise control challenges, both within the buildings and in the surrounding neighborhoods. We will present select case studies demonstrating typical problems and possible solutions.

ACGN12

Acoustics for Old and New Multi-Family Residences (HSW, 1.5 CEU)

Whether a new luxury high-rise, a century-old textile mill conversion, or a market-rate apartment building, every multi-family residential development brings a collection of acoustical challenges. Case studies will focus on sound isolation between dwelling units, around public and service areas, and at mechanical spaces. It is not surprising that as housing prices have gone up, so have people’s expectations for peace and quiet, along with their demands for reasonable levels of privacy. Neighbors are noisier than ever before, blasting action film soundtracks over multi-channel home entertainment systems while exercising on home gym equipment late at night. And, lighter building constructions are saving money, but make acoustical isolation more difficult. Based on practical examples, we will look at cost-effective ways to address the acoustical challenges presented in today’s multi-unit residences.

ACGN05

Acoustical Considerations for Multi-unit Residences

A number of modern trends have contributed to the increasing importance of good acoustical design in multi-unit dwellings. It is not surprising that as housing prices have gone up, and so have people’s expectations for peace and quiet, along with their demands for reasonable levels of privacy. Unfortunately, neighbors seem to be noisier than ever before—blasting action film soundtracks over multi-channel home entertainment systems while exercising on the home gym equipment late at night. And, although lighter building constructions are saving money, make acoustical isolation more difficult. Based on practical examples, we will look at cost effective ways to address the acoustical challenges presented in today’s multi-unit residences.

NVGN18

A Vibration Primer for Architects

Vibrations in buildings are caused by many sources and may affect people and sensitive equipment. Learn what the jargon of vibration specifications and criteria means – how vibrations are described – and get some insight into how things vibrate and how vibration reductions can be achieved. Obtain an overview of vibration sources and check-list of design considerations.

ACNV001

Acoustic and Vibration Isolation in Multi-Family Residences (HSW)

Can you hear the stereo in the next apartment over, or the footsteps of your neighbors from the condo above yours? Are you bothered by the subway every time it rumbles by? According to the International Building Code, partitions and constructions between residences should have a minimum Sound Transmission Class (STC) of 50 and a minimum Impact Insulation Class (IIC) of 50 (45 if field is measured). This language has been adopted by many state building codes (including Massachusetts). Vibration from underground rail lines can be an important source of environmental sound and vibration in residential buildings. The characteristic low-frequency rumble from passing subway trains can be a source for residents living in nearby buildings. Methods exist to predict the levels of noise and vibration from rail operations in new buildings, and the probability that a resident would be annoyed by that vibration/noise.

NVGN19

Tiptoeing 101: Construction Near Sensitive Facilities (HSW)

The existence of construction and renovation projects in populated areas inevitably creates noise and vibration for both neighbors and occupants with sensitivities ranging from inconsequential to critical. With proper understanding, consideration, and communication, a project can ensure a smoother process and minimize obstacles to cost and scheduling. In this seminar, we will compare a variety of potential adjacent sensitivities, ranging from microscopes to murals to mice, as well as data centers and performance spaces. In doing so, we will look at some real-world examples from projects and actual approaches to mitigation. By using best practices, any project can hope to proceed agreeably instead of under possibly avoidable adversarial conditions.

NVGN08

Environmental Noise Control for Improved Quality of Life

For many of us, noise from airplanes, traffic, railroads, and rooftop mechanical equipment is a part of our daily lives. Keeping this noise out of living and workspace is becoming a higher priority. In the first half of this session we will use case studies from residential sound insulation programs as the basis for practical approaches to the design of building envelopes to control intrusive environmental noise. The second half of the seminar will focus on techniques to control noise from exterior mechanical equipment (chillers, cooling towers, fan units) that affect both the interior space of the building and the surrounding community.