ACNV02

Work it Out: Fitness Centers in Mixed Use Buildings

This course is intended to help architects, engineers, and especially building owners understand the issues that can arise when trying to bring an active fitness facility into a mixed use building or development and how these issues can best be addressed. The session will include a discussion of the various types of fitness franchises and the acoustic concerns that come along with them (as well as how to deal with such concerns though architectural and managerial methods). We will also cover the basics on how sound propagates through a building, and discuss what features (in terms of building type and tenant location) to look for (or avoid) when planning for a new tenant or a new franchise location. This course will also include demonstrations and case studies of specific issues and the methods used to resolve them.

ITGN12

Audiovisual & Telecommunications Infrastructure: What You Need to Know

The course is designed to assist architects and design team members in assimilating the requirements for today’s AV and IT technologies into their projects, focusing at the planning stages. Topics covered include space planning for IT server and equipment rooms, AV control rooms, audiovisual equipment rooms, as well as infrastructure for supporting those systems. We will also review methodologies and best practices for integrating technology into specific spaces. During this portion we will discuss integrating things like video projectors, front (and rear) projection screens, video cameras, and loudspeakers into millwork enclosures and niches.

ACGN34

Auralizations: A Useful Tool in the Decision-Making Process (HSW)

Learn how an auralization, or 3DListening®, illustrates the sound quality of a room and demonstrates the acoustical difference among treatment options. See and hear examples where auralizations helped the client decide which treatments were appropriate for their budget and needs. Case studies will include the Museum of Fine Arts, a renovated natatorium at Brandeis University, and the Xielo Restaurant.

NVGN11

Hotel on Rubber Pads – Statistical Energy Analysis/Vibration Concerns

This case study will show how we used Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) to assess the potential noise and vibration problems of a hotel atop and around a vent building of Boston’s Central Artery. An outline of the SEA approach and results will be featured.

ACGN43

Auralization: BIM For Your Ears (HSW)

Much like computer modeling allows for 3D renderings of a space’s appearance, we can also create 3D models of a space’s acoustics. Auralization is a technology that allows us to hear what a space will sound like before it is built or renovated, giving everyone on the design team a direct auditory experience of the impact of room shaping, surface finishes, and potential noise sources. Creating an auralization of a space can be used to prevent under- or over-designing acoustical treatments or sound isolation and avoid potentially costly fixes postconstruction. This seminar will introduce the auralization process and provide an opportunity for attendees to hear auralizations of projects where they were used as a critical part of the design process.

ACGN41

Basic Principles of Architectural Sound Isolation

This course will discuss the basic principles of airborne sound isolation as it applies to walls and floors of buildings.

ACGN40

Acoustics in Commercial Architecture: A Survey of Best Practices, Pitfalls, and Snake Oil (HSW)

Are you concerned that you may be under-designing or over-designing your project’s acoustics? Do you wonder if certain ‘acoustical’ products are a good value? Please join us for an accessible and candid discussion of fundamental acoustics design strategies for several of the most common building types. We will highlight architectural elements that warrant conservative acoustical design, and we will dispel some of the misunderstandings and marketing mystique that lead to overly expensive constructions.

ACGN37

Acoustics for Large Spaces

This presentation will discuss the new acoustic challenges facing project teams regarding multi-functional needs of large spaces. We will focus on atria, where the use of these spaces has been redefined from a traditional pass-through space to include musical performances and lectures, creating new challenges for appropriate background sound levels and speech intelligibility. We will also discuss how these challenges are currently handled in other large spaces where the acoustic design may need to be modified to accommodate broader programming uses. Learn about general design practices via case studies of several performance atria.

NVGN20

Safe and Sound! Protecting your Facility with Remote Monitoring

Vibration monitoring services provide real-time analysis and feedback to construction teams, facility managers, and/or end users of highly sensitive projects at hospitals, universities, corporate research labs, manufacturing facilities, performance halls, recording studios, animal facilities, data centers, museums and even offices. Deployed at the project site, monitoring systems send tailored alarms or warning notifications by email and text if levels exceed location-specific thresholds, as well as stream data to a private central website for viewing by authorized personnel. The systems allow firms to appropriately monitor these types of facilities, whose requirements are beyond the capability of traditional seismographs (for building damage) and sound level meters (for code enforcement). Ultimately, the systems help to eliminate guesswork, inefficiencies and after-the-fact claims for the contractor, and give peace of mind to the facility who know someone is watching the line for their interests. Our brief presentation will give an overview of the systems, their use on projects, and the benefits and lessons learned through their use.

AVGN13

Interior Technology: Designing High-Tech Spaces that People Love to Use

People want the latest technologies, but for these products to be considered successful they must be (a) easy-to-use (b) well-integrated into the building infrastructure and (c) reliable. In this session we will discuss strategies for sophisticated room design and share comments from end-users. Optimal high-tech design requires close design team collaboration. All of the participants (architect, interior designer, client’s staff and consultants) play a role in creating the high-tech environment that people will use. It is also a process of compromise since the real world requires well-thought out trade-offs in budgetary, technical, operational and administrative objectives and goals.