ACAV11

Senior Hospital(ity): Acoustic and AV Design Across the Continuum of Care (HSW)

America’s Baby Boomers are entering retirement and many are starting to think about the next stage of their lives. Retirement communities and senior living facilities have seen a marked population increase in the past decade, and that trend is expected to continue. When planning a new facility for seniors, there are special technology and acoustic considerations — these aren’t your typical multi-family projects. In this session, we will discuss how new FGI guidelines apply to senior living facilities, skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers, and hospitals, as well as how to address the unique acoustics requirements of an aging population. We will also discuss how technology is being increasingly used as a method to aid in the delivery of patient care.

ACHC02

Quiet Patient Rooms: Why Medicare Cares and You Should Too (HSW)

Medicare is tying hospital reimbursements to scores on a patient satisfaction survey called HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems). One of the questions on this survey asks the patient how quiet the area was around their patient room. Design strategies for achieving “quiet” will be discussed along with a big picture view of the changing Medicare reimbursement program.

HIPAA & GLBA – Consumer Privacy Laws

Those working in Healthcare know the importance of HIPPA & GLBA and their impact on privacy protection for patients in America. The first of these laws became effective in April, 2003. Consumers have already filed thousands upon thousands of complaints with federal government agencies regarding violations to these standards. One of the top 3 concerns is “overheard conversations,” prompting healthcare and financial services organizations to seek privacy solutions that can be retrofitted or included in new construction. This session covers the laws, their impact on architects, and proven solutions that can be implemented quickly and inexpensively.

NVGN01

Overview of Vibration Design Criteria in Laboratory and High-Tech Facilities

An introduction to the architectural issues related to such vibration-sensitive equipment as used for precision metrology, microbiology, and optical research. We will describe viable approaches for protecting such equipment from vibrations caused by ground motions, personnel activities, and machinery. Topics will include the concepts of favorable layouts, structures, and equipment isolation.

ACNV001

Acoustic and Vibration Isolation in Multi-Family Residences (HSW)

Can you hear the stereo in the next apartment over, or the footsteps of your neighbors from the condo above yours? Are you bothered by the subway every time it rumbles by? According to the International Building Code, partitions and constructions between residences should have a minimum Sound Transmission Class (STC) of 50 and a minimum Impact Insulation Class (IIC) of 50 (45 if field is measured). This language has been adopted by many state building codes (including Massachusetts). Vibration from underground rail lines can be an important source of environmental sound and vibration in residential buildings. The characteristic low-frequency rumble from passing subway trains can be a source for residents living in nearby buildings. Methods exist to predict the levels of noise and vibration from rail operations in new buildings, and the probability that a resident would be annoyed by that vibration/noise.

NVGN19

Tiptoeing 101: Construction Near Sensitive Facilities (HSW)

The existence of construction and renovation projects in populated areas inevitably creates noise and vibration for both neighbors and occupants with sensitivities ranging from inconsequential to critical. With proper understanding, consideration, and communication, a project can ensure a smoother process and minimize obstacles to cost and scheduling. In this seminar, we will compare a variety of potential adjacent sensitivities, ranging from microscopes to murals to mice, as well as data centers and performance spaces. In doing so, we will look at some real-world examples from projects and actual approaches to mitigation. By using best practices, any project can hope to proceed agreeably instead of under possibly avoidable adversarial conditions.

ITGN13

The Intelligent Building is Finally Here: How high-speed networks are changing Building Design (HSW)

Now that the concept of using one network to transport telephone, data and Internet traffic has become the norm, the converged network is rapidly expanding to support video, multimedia, digital signage, security, building control, building management and building automation system applications. This presentation will review how trends in technology and converged networking are changing building design, the need for technology support spaces and the demand for traditional wired data outlets.

AVGN02

Physical Attributes of Successful Videoconferencing Rooms

Designing videoconferencing facilities is one of the most complex design challenges for architects today, similar in many ways to the complexity and scope of designing a hospital operating room. This program will help architects and project managers understand the structural and architectural ramifications of professionally designed videoconferencing venues. Topics covered include ideal room attributes, fundamentals of audio and video conferencing, text and graphic legibility standards, sightline and seating considerations, architectural acoustics and mechanical systems noise criteria.

NVGN20

Safe and Sound! Protecting your Facility with Remote Monitoring

Vibration monitoring services provide real-time analysis and feedback to construction teams, facility managers, and/or end users of highly sensitive projects at hospitals, universities, corporate research labs, manufacturing facilities, performance halls, recording studios, animal facilities, data centers, museums and even offices. Deployed at the project site, monitoring systems send tailored alarms or warning notifications by email and text if levels exceed location-specific thresholds, as well as stream data to a private central website for viewing by authorized personnel. The systems allow firms to appropriately monitor these types of facilities, whose requirements are beyond the capability of traditional seismographs (for building damage) and sound level meters (for code enforcement). Ultimately, the systems help to eliminate guesswork, inefficiencies and after-the-fact claims for the contractor, and give peace of mind to the facility who know someone is watching the line for their interests. Our brief presentation will give an overview of the systems, their use on projects, and the benefits and lessons learned through their use.

NVGN03

Vibration Considerations in High-Tech and Laboratory Environments

An introduction to planning and designing for footfall induced vibration and structural dynamics. A multi-million dollar facility is only as good as the planning that goes into it to assure that vibration criteria are met before research or testing begins. Presentation includes a case study for MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) devices.