ACED07

How to be a Good Neighbor: College Campuses and Community Noise

Neighbors to campus environments can be disturbed by sounds other than those produced by students. Whether from laboratory exhaust systems, the central plant or small air conditioning units, sounds from the campus mechanical equipment can be a sensitive issue for neighboring residences. We will cover a variety of different types of equipment and the approaches for suitable noise control to help support a positive town and gown relationship.

ACGN15

Vibration and Noise in AIR-RIGHTS Buildings

With an ever-increasing interest in constructing buildings close to hectic traffic corridors, intrusive vibrations and noise have emerged as major concerns for designers. We will discuss the basic mechanisms of vibration, noise generation, structural transmission, criteria for evaluating the potential problems, and the means for addressing these issues.

NVGN11

Hotel on Rubber Pads – Statistical Energy Analysis/Vibration Concerns

This case study will show how we used Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) to assess the potential noise and vibration problems of a hotel atop and around a vent building of Boston’s Central Artery. An outline of the SEA approach and results will be featured.

ACNV001

Acoustic and Vibration Isolation in Multi-Family Residences (HSW)

Can you hear the stereo in the next apartment over, or the footsteps of your neighbors from the condo above yours? Are you bothered by the subway every time it rumbles by? According to the International Building Code, partitions and constructions between residences should have a minimum Sound Transmission Class (STC) of 50 and a minimum Impact Insulation Class (IIC) of 50 (45 if field is measured). This language has been adopted by many state building codes (including Massachusetts). Vibration from underground rail lines can be an important source of environmental sound and vibration in residential buildings. The characteristic low-frequency rumble from passing subway trains can be a source for residents living in nearby buildings. Methods exist to predict the levels of noise and vibration from rail operations in new buildings, and the probability that a resident would be annoyed by that vibration/noise.

NVGN19

Tiptoeing 101: Construction Near Sensitive Facilities (HSW)

The existence of construction and renovation projects in populated areas inevitably creates noise and vibration for both neighbors and occupants with sensitivities ranging from inconsequential to critical. With proper understanding, consideration, and communication, a project can ensure a smoother process and minimize obstacles to cost and scheduling. In this seminar, we will compare a variety of potential adjacent sensitivities, ranging from microscopes to murals to mice, as well as data centers and performance spaces. In doing so, we will look at some real-world examples from projects and actual approaches to mitigation. By using best practices, any project can hope to proceed agreeably instead of under possibly avoidable adversarial conditions.

NVGN16

Controlling Cogen and Chiller Plant Noise & Vibration in Educational Settings (HSW)

Educational facility expansion projects often include installing new or upgrading existing chiller and cogeneration power equipment. The noise and vibration produced by chiller and power plants can become issues within adjacent building spaces and in the nearby community. To address these issues in a cost-effective manner, they should be evaluated early-on in the overall project design phase, and as indicated, be resolved with the project team. We will outline the evaluation process, highlight cost-effective mitigation measures, and discuss several representative projects.

NVGN08

Environmental Noise Control for Improved Quality of Life

For many of us, noise from airplanes, traffic, railroads, and rooftop mechanical equipment is a part of our daily lives. Keeping this noise out of living and workspace is becoming a higher priority. In the first half of this session we will use case studies from residential sound insulation programs as the basis for practical approaches to the design of building envelopes to control intrusive environmental noise. The second half of the seminar will focus on techniques to control noise from exterior mechanical equipment (chillers, cooling towers, fan units) that affect both the interior space of the building and the surrounding community.

ITGN20

Meeting the Code – NFAP Intelligibility of Large Scale Communication Systems

Acoustic and sound system design for large facilities is crucial in order to provide clear intelligible voice communications for a variety of acoustic spaces. Facilities like transportation terminals, healthcare facilities, arenas, casinos, and convention centers should know the difference between paging systems and mass communication systems, whether for new or retrofitted projects. With two important changes in 2013 to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) 72 National Fire Alarm and Code Book, facility managers need to understand why audibility is no longer enough. Intelligibility is the new standard. The new NFPA code recognizes the difference between designing for audibility and intelligibility, and goes further to set coverage standards for acoustically distinguishable spaces (ADS).

ITGN13

The Intelligent Building is Finally Here: How high-speed networks are changing Building Design (HSW)

Now that the concept of using one network to transport telephone, data and Internet traffic has become the norm, the converged network is rapidly expanding to support video, multimedia, digital signage, security, building control, building management and building automation system applications. This presentation will review how trends in technology and converged networking are changing building design, the need for technology support spaces and the demand for traditional wired data outlets.

NVGN21

Real-Time Monitoring during Construction: Co-Existing with Vibration-Sensitive Issues

The existence of construction and renovation projects in populated areas inevitably creates noise and vibration for both neighbors and occupants with sensitivities ranging from inconsequential to critical. Through a proper understanding of specialized, ultra-low requirements and the use of real-time feedback from monitoring systems, projects can be managed to eliminate guesswork, inefficiencies and after-the-fact claims for the contractor, and give peace of mind to the facility owner who knows someone is watching their interests. In this workshop, we will compare a variety of potential adjacent sensitivities, ranging from university research labs, health care facilities, museums, data centers and performance spaces. In doing so, we will look at some real-world examples from projects and actual approaches to mitigation and monitoring. By using best practices, any project can hope to proceed agreeably instead of under possibly avoidable adversarial conditions.