ACNV02

Work it Out: Fitness Centers in Mixed Use Buildings

This course is intended to help architects, engineers, and especially building owners understand the issues that can arise when trying to bring an active fitness facility into a mixed use building or development and how these issues can best be addressed. The session will include a discussion of the various types of fitness franchises and the acoustic concerns that come along with them (as well as how to deal with such concerns though architectural and managerial methods). We will also cover the basics on how sound propagates through a building, and discuss what features (in terms of building type and tenant location) to look for (or avoid) when planning for a new tenant or a new franchise location. This course will also include demonstrations and case studies of specific issues and the methods used to resolve them.

NVHC01

Noise and Vibration in Healthcare Facilities (HSW)

Healthcare facilities generally house a variety of equipment and spaces that are sensitive to noise and vibration. This presentation will address issues related to day-to-day operations, unique situations that arise, such as those due to nearby construction. We introduce the concepts of vibration and noise criteria as they relate to sensitive equipment and spaces. Using the special case of MRIs, we will discuss potential sources of building vibration and mitigation measures. We will also discuss the potential impacts of the MRI operation on neighboring spaces with respect to airborne noise and structure-borne vibration. Construction-related vibrations are also a potentially huge source of disruption for hospital facilities. We will examine the potential impact of construction vibrations, methods to predict impact and possible mitigation methods.

ACHC01

Acoustics and Healthcare Facilities (HSW)

Effective designs for healthcare facilities include attention to acoustics. This session will be a survey of architectural acoustics and mechanical system noise and vibration concerns relating to healthcare facilities. Learn fundamental elements for addressing speech privacy, sound isolation, room finishes, and HVAC noise and vibration control. Topics will be organized by design phase to present a logical and cost effective approach.

ACAV11

Senior Hospital(ity): Acoustic and AV Design Across the Continuum of Care (HSW)

America’s Baby Boomers are entering retirement and many are starting to think about the next stage of their lives. Retirement communities and senior living facilities have seen a marked population increase in the past decade, and that trend is expected to continue. When planning a new facility for seniors, there are special technology and acoustic considerations — these aren’t your typical multi-family projects. In this session, we will discuss how new FGI guidelines apply to senior living facilities, skilled nursing and rehabilitation centers, and hospitals, as well as how to address the unique acoustics requirements of an aging population. We will also discuss how technology is being increasingly used as a method to aid in the delivery of patient care.

ACHC02

Quiet Patient Rooms: Why Medicare Cares and You Should Too (HSW)

Medicare is tying hospital reimbursements to scores on a patient satisfaction survey called HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems). One of the questions on this survey asks the patient how quiet the area was around their patient room. Design strategies for achieving “quiet” will be discussed along with a big picture view of the changing Medicare reimbursement program.

ACGN44

Office Speech Privacy: Design Vs. reality (with lessons learned in the field) (HSW)

Speech privacy is an important factor toward achieving productive workplaces. While the term ‘speech privacy’ can relate to the goal of confidentiality when having sensitive conversations, more frequently the topic is critical for creating conditions for staff to work productively with minimal distractions from the surrounding workplace activities. A discussion of the important factors that relate to effective speech privacy will be covered. Following this introduction, we will discuss how speech privacy is achieved in open and closed offices through appropriate design of workplace. We will also highlight lessons learned about the challenges to achieving speech privacy in newly constructed workspaces. This discussion will cover the important aspects of the office layouts (using either studs and drywall or modular panels), sound absorbing finishes and background sound.

ACGN38

Addressing Sound Transmission in Residence (HSW)

Ever since the beginning of multi-family dwellings, sound isolation between residential units has generated significant tension. Residents want privacy from the people living next to them, even though they may be less than a few feet away from one another. According to the International Building Code, partitions and constructions between residences should have a minimum Sound Transmission Class (STC) of 50 and a minimum Impact Insulation Class (IIC) of 50 (45 if field measured). This language has been adopted by many state building codes including New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

ACGN45

There Goes the Neighborhood! (or not) – Acoustical Considerations for Mixed-Use Developments (HSW)

Many urban centers are seeing an increased interest in mixed-use developments, which provide numerous advantages. However, these developments also pose significant noise control challenges, both within the buildings and in the surrounding neighborhoods. We will present select case studies demonstrating typical problems and possible solutions.

ACGN14

Office Acoustics (HSW)

This session will focus on achieving speech privacy in both open and closed offices. The emphasis will be on practical design options: for open plan offices, we will discuss how specific workstation configurations can reduce unwanted noise and allow for speech privacy. For instance, ceiling finishes and sound masking systems work together to minimize audible distractions. For closed offices, the focus will be on walls and ceilings. So when does it make sense to run drywall to the deck, and when is it acceptable to stop 6” above the ceiling line? Find out by attending this presentation.

ACAV01

Worship Spaces Acoustic & Systems (HSW)

Whether it’s a historic landmark or a new structure, effective worship spaces can be “tuned” for speech, music, and now video usage. Learn how designs blending architectural acoustics considerations, sound systems, and multimedia systems together can enhance the environments and appeal of 21st-century worship spaces.